Apples Reduce Bad Cholesterol (LDL) By 23%, Increase Good Cholesterol (HDL) By 4%, Finds New Study

APPLES are truly a “miracle fruit” that convey benefits beyond fiber content. Bahram H. Arjmandi of Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences at The Florida State University in Tallahassee has found that eating an apple or two a day appears to lower levels of cholesterol and two other markers associated with plaques and inflammation in artery walls.

In his study, postmenopausal women who ate an apple a day gained heart healthy benefits and even lost weight in a study from food science researchers. In six-months, women age 45 to 65, lowered dangerous LDL cholesterol, raised beneficial HDL cholesterol levels and lost a few pounds from consuming dried apples. The study shows apples could be a heart healthy snack for everyone; not just women.

Indeed, the findings are of great interest to diabetics who must maintain tight control of their blood sugar levels every day. Uncontrolled diabetes puts them at greater risk for heart disease.

Arjmandi’s recent research is the first to evaluate the long-term cardioprotective effects of daily consumption of apple in postmenopausal women, says a news release. The results of the study, which were presented at Experimental Biology 2011 on April 12 in Washington, DC, should be considered preliminary as they have not yet undergone the “peer review” process, in which outside experts scrutinize the data prior to publication in a medical journal.

Arjmandi reported that “incredible changes in the apple-eating women happened by 6 months ‒ they experienced a 23% decrease in LDL cholesterol. The daily apple consumption also led to a lowering of lipid hydroperoxide levels and C-reactive protein in those women.  “I never expected apple consumption to reduce bad cholesterol to this extent while increasing HDL cholesterol or good cholesterol by about 4%,” he said.

Though the study used dried apples for convenience, Arjmandi said fresh are likely to be even better. And it doesn’t matter if they’re green, red, or golden. “Any varieties of apples are good,” he said.

Yet another advantage is that the extra 240 calories per day consumed from the dried apple did not lead to weight gain in the women; in fact, they lost on average 1.5kg (3.3lb). “Reducing body weight is an added benefit to daily apple intake” he said. Part of the reason for the weight loss could be the fruit’s pectin, which is known to have a satiety effect.

This study randomly assigned 160 women ages 45-65 to one of two dietary intervention groups: one received dried apples daily (75g/day for 1 year) and the other group ate dried prunes every day for a year. Blood samples were taken at 3, 6 and 12-months.

Experts said the study’s results were consistent with previous evidence that apples do indeed live up to the famous adage about keeping the doctor away.

“When we look at the whole composite of human studies and animal studies and in vitro lab studies, when you look at the active components in apples and apple juice, there’s definitely benefit,” Dianne A. Hyson, PhD, RD, a nutritionist and researcher at the University of California at Davis was quoted as saying in a WebMD Health News report.

Hyson, who was not involved in the current research, recently completed a review of 80 studies, published since 2005, on the health benefits of apples, and she said that in addition to their cardiovascular benefits, there’s some evidence that apples help regulate blood sugar and control appetite, protect against cancer, and safeguard the lungs.

Another key, Dyson said, is eating the whole fruit, rather than looking for individual components in supplements. “Most of the time, in many studies, the whole is better than the sum of its parts,” she said. As far as how much to eat, just follow the apple-a-day adage, though Arjmandi said two-a-day might be even better. “That’s doable and practical and people like apples,” he said.

The next step in confirming the results of this study is a multi-investigator nationwide study.

Source: Experimental Biology 2011 Onsite Newsroom

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Comments

  • Lauren  On May 18, 2011 at 10:08 pm

    Now I am going to start eating an apple a day! Thank you!

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